What’s Your Coaching Style?

Everybody has one. You may not know yours yet, maybe because you haven’t been in a situation to coach someone or maybe you just have little to no self-awareness?

It’s time to pay attention.

You can affect someone’s performance at work by simply presenting your message in a different way—body language included. Read on to see if any of these coaching styles resonates with yours.

  1. “My Way or the Highway”: This kind of coach leaves little to no room for negotiation or input by the employee. The final call is always theirs—talk about micromanager. Employees who want or need more direction will typically do well with this style of coaching, while more independent employees might run into some conflict. This person develops discipline in their employees, but doesn’t really exapnd  the entire scope of understanding in their role.
  2. “It’s All Business”: This coaching style is matter-of-fact, logical, and significantly less emotionally invested. They want you to ask questions, and value learning. They are concerned more about the process and therefore goals are focused on that—the process more than the end results. Busy and self-directed professionals, with less need for external motivation will often respond well to this kind of coach. However, young or new employees, or those who score higher on the sensitivity chart may not respond as well.
  3. “It’s All You”: This kind of coaching style is more democratic, and ecourages employees to be fully involved in workplace decisions. This coach prefers an interactive and cooperative approach to training. Not surprisingly, this style works well for experienced and independent employees.

 

Your style could be a mix or somewhere in between. What style do you prefer? Why? Take note of your employees’ career levels and personalities so you can switch up your coaching style as they need it. You’d be surprised at how effective it is.